Pringles Ring STEM Challenge (Includes FREE Recording Sheet)

Pringles Ring STEM Challenge (Includes FREE Recording Sheet)

Can you build a ring using only Pringles chips?

The Pringles Ringle is an engineering challenge in which students create a ring using only Pringles chips, no tape or glue allowed!

The challenge requires a lot of patience as well as careful and precise chip placement. Although, the hardest part of the challenge is not eating all of the chips before finishing the ring.

Before you get started, be sure to download the FREE recording sheet HERE!

PRINGLES RING STEM CHALLENGE

Material List (for each group of 2-4 students):

  • 1 can of Pringles chips

  • pencils and recording sheets

Divide students into groups of 3-4.

Give each group the materials listed above. Challenge students to build a ring using only 1 can of Pringles.

In order to create the ring, students should only use complete chips. Any chips that are broken can be eaten or disposed of. Using complete chips will ensure that the ring is as strong as possible.

Challenge Tips:

Before the challenge have students plan out their chip ring design. Depending on the ages of your students you may also want to ask some of the following questions in order to help them process through the challenge:

  • How will the base of your ring be able to support the top?

  • Will you layer your chips in a certain pattern? If so, what pattern?

  • What other strategies will you try if your first design doesn’t work as planned?

We believe asking questions throughout STEM challenges helps students think through the challenge and scaffolds the process so that they are able to come up with solutions on their own. You can learn more about STEM Questioning Strategies in this blog post.

Pringles Ring STEM Challenge

The Physics Behind the Challenge:

How does the Pringles Ringle work?

As the sides of the ring get taller, gravity pushes down on the chips causing them to slide down. In order for the chips to not slide, there must be enough frictional force on the sides of the chips so that gravity can’t push it down.

For more STEM ideas, inspiration, and collaboration with other STEM teachers be sure to join our FREE Facebook group Elementary STEM Teachers Club!

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